AG News Archives and previous news articles that matter to our members.

Agriculture

Local Public Hearing times, dates and places.

Public Hearings

Wisconsin Legislative Spotlight

Maintained by the Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau (LRB), this page provides an overview of recent and upcoming activities in the Wisconsin Legislature. The LRB revises its content weekly. Links to more detailed information are highlighted in the text. READ

The Governor’s

2015-17 Budget

On February 3, 2015, Governor Walker delivered his budget address.

• Budget in Brief  READ

• 2015-17 Executive Budget (Complete Document) READ

• About the Budget Documents READ

• How to Read the 2015-17 Executive Budget READ

• Statewide Budget and Position Summaries READ

*an interactive almanac

of U.S. politics

2015 SESSION SCHEDULE

AT A GLANCE

June 9 to 30, 2015, OR budget passage

Wisconsin Acts

Continuously Updated

 

Wisconsin Blue Book

2013-2014

Published Biennially in Odd-Numbered Years

Property Tax Bill Estimates Under January 2014 Special Session Proposal Read Here

 

2013-15 and 2015-17 General Fund Budget Under January 2014 Special Session Bills Read Here

 

Distributional Information on Proposed Individual Income Tax Rate Reduction  Read Here

 

Wisconsin Alternative Minimum Tax and January 2014 Special Session Bills   Read Here

New IoH law makes 20 changes

The bill makes more than 20 adjustments to the Implements of Husbandry (IOH) law, including:

 

• Clarifies in state statute that IOH with rubber tracks can legally operate on Wisconsin roadways.

 

• To alleviate the potential issuance of thousands of permits across the state, it authorizes an IOH or (agricultural commercial motor vehicle) Ag-CMV being legally operated with a permit to cross any intersecting highway under the jurisdiction of the maintaining authority that issued the permit.

 

• Provides the same weight, length, width and height limitations for transporting IOH by trailer or semitrailer from farm-to-farm, from field-to-field, or from farm-to-field to the same extent as if the IOH were being operated on the roadway.

 

• The special axle weight exemption given to Category B planting, tillage, cultivating and harvesting IOH is also given to Ag-CMVs that directly distribute feed to livestock, or directly apply fertilizer, lime, spray or seeds, but not manure, to a farm field.

 

• Ag-CMVs that have the capability to directly apply manure to a field, but are unable to due to field conditions, will be able to park on a road and off-load the manure to another piece of equipment for application, and still retain Ag-CMV status.

 

Earlier this month the State Senate and State Assembly unanimously approved Assembly Bill 113.

TWO
Differing Views  Where Do
YOU Fit In?

Who We Are

and What We Do

Wisconsin Property Taxpayers, Inc. (WPT)

is the voice of Wisconsin’s property taxpayers in the State Capitol, working to reduce the statewide property tax burden and reform Wisconsin’s antiquated and regressive property tax system.

 

Founded in 1985, WPT represents the interests of thousands of commercial, agricultural and residential property taxpayers throughout the state who volunteer their financial support and personal commitment to the organization and its objectives.

 

WPT is the only statewide taxpayers’ organization registered with the Ethics Division of the State’s Government Accountability Board to lobby exclusively for property tax relief and reform.

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WPT’s experienced government relations specialists, field representatives and technical support staff conduct a variety of activities including legislative analysis, policy and opinion research, media relations, public information and legislative liaison service, to increase public and legislative support for the organization’s public policy objectives.

 

WPT regularly communicates with members through personal contact, newsletters, member surveys, policy briefs and legislative action alerts.

 

WPT assists members in dealing with local property tax issues and answers members’ questions related to assessments, property tax exemptions, state laws and administrative rules, and provides information useful in appealing and reducing their property tax liability.

 

For more information about who we are, what we do, and what we have helped to accomplish over the years,  go here

 

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WPT: The Voice of Wisconsin’s Property Taxpayers Since 1985

2nd QTR Newsletter will be coming soon!

In the mean time enjoy reading the 2015 1st QTR Newsletter here.

2015 1st Quarter

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WPT Publications

WPT Newsletters are published

4 times a year, and are mailed directly to our members. To view previous editions and other publications in our Media archive click the link below.

 

Publications

Independence day celebration at Governor Walker's residence on Lake Mendota.

                Wisconsin Property Taxes

                By County

You can choose any county from our list of Wisconsin counties for detailed information on that county's property tax, and the contact information for the county tax assessor's office.

 

Adams  $1,974   Tax Assessor

Ashland $1,764   Tax Assessor

Barron  $2,242  Tax Assessor

Bayfield   $1,896  Tax Assessor

Brown  $2,900  Tax Assessor

Buffalo  $2,047  Tax Assessor

Burnett  $1,870  Tax Assessor

Calumet  $2,902  Tax Assessor

Chippewa  $2,123  Tax Assessor

Clark  $1,928  Tax Assessor

Columbia  $2,988  Tax Assessor

Crawford  $2,244  Tax Assessor

Dane  $4,149  Tax Assessor

Dodge  $2,884  Tax Assessor

Door  $2,357  Tax Assessor

Douglas  $2,076  Tax Assessor

Dunn  $2,823  Tax Assessor

Eau Claire $2,616  Tax Assessor

Florence  $1,682  Tax Assessor

Fond du Lac  $2,624  Tax Assessor

Forest  $1,712  Tax Assessor

Grant  $2,051  Tax Assessor

Green  $2,976  Tax Assessor

Green Lake  $2,311  Tax Assessor

Iowa  $2,925  Tax Assessor

Iron  $1,520  Tax Assessor

Jackson  $1,962  Tax Assessor

Jefferson  $3,099  Tax Assessor

Juneau  $2,020  Tax Assessor

Kenosha  $3,520  Tax Assessor

Kewaunee  $2,361  Tax Assessor

La Crosse  $2,912  Tax Assessor

Lafayette  $2,331  Tax Assessor

Langlade  $1,791  Tax Assessor

Lincoln  $2,154  Tax Assessor

Manitowoc   $2,351  Tax Assessor

Marathon  $2,602  Tax Assessor

Marinette  $1,604  Tax Assessor

Marquette  $2,192  Tax Assessor

Menominee  $2,654  Tax Assessor

Milwaukee  $3,707  Tax Assessor

Monroe  $2,357  Tax Assessor

Oconto  $2,198  Tax Assessor

Oneida  $2,040  Tax Assessor

Outagamie  $2,779  Tax Assessor

Ozaukee  $4,033  Tax Assessor

Pepin  $2,531  Tax Assessor

Pierce  $3,542  Tax Assessor

Polk  $2,649  Tax Assessor

Portage  $2,536  Tax Assessor

Price   $1,775  Tax Assessor

Racine  $3,312  Tax Assessor

Richland  $2,200  Tax Assessor

Rock  $2,706  Tax Assessor

Rusk $1,572  Tax Assessor

Sauk   $2,758  Tax Assessor

Sawyer   $1,759  Tax Assessor

Shawano  $1,972  Tax Assessor

Sheboygan   $2,875  Tax Assessor

St. Croix  $3,367  Tax Assessor

Taylor  $2,052  Tax Assessor

Trempealeau  $2,437 Tax Assessor

Vernon  $2,299  Tax Assessor

Vilas   $1,976  Tax Assessor

Walworth  $3,323  Tax Assessor

Washburn   $1,897  Tax Assessor

Washington  $3,502  Tax Assessor

Waukesha  $3,954  Tax Assessor

Waupaca  $2,411  Tax Assessor

Waushara  $2,125  Tax Assessor

Winnebago  $2,763  Tax Assessor

Wood  $2,078  Tax Assessor

DOR Guides for Property Taxpayers

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Stay Informed

WPT is the voice of Wisconsin’s Property Taxpayers, your voice, in the Wisconsin State Legislature. Whether you have a comment, a thought to share, a question about your assessment or property tax bill, how your property tax dollars are spent, what’s going on in the Legislature, or any of a thousand property tax related questions we answer for our members, WPT wants to hear from you.

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and rely on us to protect their

interests in the Legislature

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Current Issues

We are involved in everything that affects our members’ property tax burden. Some of the articles below may take you from WPTonline. Simply click your back browser to return.

Current News

Vos: Assembly may advance budget without

JFC vote

6/30/2015

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos Monday unveiled a prevailing wage package and a draft of the Bucks legislation in back-to-back news conferences, saying his caucus was prepared to move forward after a month long delay on the state budget.

READ MORE

 

Wisconsin budget year ending with no

agreement in sight

June 30, 2015  •  By SCOTT BAUER

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin's budget year is set to end Tuesday with no last-minute legislative theatrics or looming government shutdown.   READ MORE

 

Milwaukee Bucks co-owner Wes Edens lobbied lawmakers for arena on latest Wisconsin visit

Jun 29, 2015, 2:52pm CDT  Updated Jun 29, 2015, 7:55pm CDT

Rich Kirchen    Milwaukee Business Journal

Milwaukee Bucks co-owner Wes Edens book-ended a trip to Milwaukee for the June 23 Rolling Stones concert and the June 25 NBA draft with a visit to Madison where he met with Republican legislative leaders to discuss the proposed $250 million public arena-funding plan.  READ MORE

 

 

 

WPT Ag NewsAgriculture

 

                                   It’s June Dairy Month!!

 

Meijer spends $100M annually buying produce from Midwest farmers

By  Shandra Martinez | smartinez@mlive.com

on June 30, 2015 at 4:38 PM, updated June 30, 2015 at 4:41 PM

GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- Meijer Inc. is now spending $100 million buying "locally grown" produce from Midwest farmers, the Midwest retailer said Tuesday, June 30.  READ MORE

 

WCGA, WBFA Call On EPA to Hold Hearing in Wisconsin

June 23, 2015  •  CHARLES BABINGTON Associated Press

Wisconsin Ag Connection - 06/29/2015

As farmers, consumers and industry leaders make their voices heard this week in Kansas, Wisconsin bio fuels advocates are asking the Environmental Protection Agency to host a hearing in the Badger State on the proposed renewable fuel standard and renewable volume obligations.  READ MORE

 

Opponents fear manure runoff from proposed Wisconsin hog megafarm would pollute Lake Superior

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS  Published: 6/28/15 3:40 pm EDT - Updated: 6/28/15 3:43 pm EDT

MILWAUKEE — A proposed hog "megafarm" in northern Wisconsin is raising concerns among some residents that millions of gallons of pig manure will eventually wash off the land and pollute Lake Superior.  READ MORE

Capitol Report        2015

3rd Quarter | July

PDF use your back button to return

Our own Ag Member Representative Donovan Dolph - July 4th, 2014

How Property Taxes Work

 

August 1, 2011 04:18 PM ITEP

The property tax is the oldest major revenue source for state and local governments. At the beginning of the twentieth century, property taxes represented more than eighty percent of state and local tax revenue. While this share has diminished over time as states have introduced sales and income taxes, the property tax remains an important mechanism for funding education and other local services. This policy brief discusses why property is taxed and how property taxes are calculated.

 

Why Tax Property?

 

The property tax is rooted largely in the “benefits principle” of taxation. Under this view, the property tax essentially functions as a user-charge on local residents for the benefits they receive from the local policies funded by property taxes. These policies benefit local residents directly in the form of better schools and fire protection, and indirectly in the form of increased housing values.

 

The property tax also helps differentiate between families of very different means by taxing families with large quantities of wealth more heavily than those without such reserves. But the impact that property taxes can have on low-income families, and particularly the elderly, makes clear that the linkage of the property tax to the ability-to-pay principle is far from perfect.

 

Finally, the stability and enforceability of the property tax make it among the best options available for providing local governments with a predictable revenue stream that can be used to fund indispensable services like schools, roads, and public safety.

 

How Property Taxes Work

 

Historically, property taxes applied to two kinds of property: real property, which includes land and buildings, and personal property,

which includes

moveable items

such as cars, boats,

and the value of

stocks and bonds.

Most states have

moved away from

taxing personal

property and now

impose taxes

primarily on real

property.

 

In its simplest form, the real property tax is calculated by multiplying the value of land and buildings by the tax rate. Property tax rates are normally expressed in mills. A mill is one-tenth of one percent. In the most basic system, an owner of a property worth $100,000 that is subject to a 25 mill (that is, 2.5 percent) tax rate would pay $2,500 in property taxes. In reality, however, property taxes are often more complicated than this. The first step in the property tax process is determining a property’s value for tax purposes. In most cases, this means estimating the property’s market value, the amount the property would likely sell for.

 

The second step is determining the property’s assessed value, its value for tax purposes. This is done by multiplying the property’s market value by an assessment ratio, which is a percentage ranging from zero to one hundred. Many states base their taxes upon actual market value—in other words, these states use a 100 percent assessment ratio. A significant number of states, however, assess property at only a fraction of its actual value. New Mexico assesses homes at 33.3 percent of their market value, and Arkansas uses a 20 percent assessment ratio. Some states place a cap on increases in a home’s assessed value in any given year, which in many cases can lead to vastly different assessment ratios among similarly valued homes (For more detail, see ITEP Brief, “Capping Assessed Valuation Growth: A Primer”). And even when the law says properties should be assessed at 100 percent of their value, local assessors at times systematically under-assess property, reporting assessed values that are substantially less than the real market value of the property.

 

After the assessment ratio has been factored in, many states reduce a property’s assessed value further by allowing exemptions. The most common type of exemption is referred to as a “homestead exemption.” In Ohio, for example, the state allows an exemption for the first $25,000 of home value. Subtracting all exemptions yields the taxable value of a property. (For more on homestead exemptions, see ITEP Brief, “Property Tax Homestead Exemptions”).

 

The next step in the process is applying a property tax rate, also known as a millage rate, to the property’s taxable value. The millage rate is usually the sum of several tax rates applied by several different jurisdictions: for example, one property might be subject to a municipal tax, a county tax, and a school district tax. This calculation yields the tentative property tax before credits.

 

Many states allow property tax credits that either directly reduce the property tax bill, or that reimburse part of the property tax bill separately when taxpayers apply for them. Subtracting these credits is the final step in calculating one’s property tax bill—though taxpayers are often required to pay the pre-credit property tax amount, only to later have the amount of the credit refunded to them. (For more detail on one type of property tax credit, see ITEP brief, “Property Tax Circuit Breakers”).

 

Other Property Tax Issues

 

While property taxes on owner-occupied homes tend to receive the most attention, the presence (or absence) of tax on other forms of property also has important implications.

 

Businesses pay property taxes just like local residents. Property taxes on businesses are mostly borne by business owners. Business property taxes generally make the property tax less regressive, since business owners tend to be wealthier than average.

 

Property taxes also impact taxpayers who rent, rather than own their home. This is because owners of rental real estate pass through some of their tax liability to renters in the form of higher rents. The impact of property taxes on renters is of particular concern because renters tend to be significantly less well-off than their homeowner neighbors.

Non-profit entities are generally exempt from state and local property taxes. While these exemptions can make it easier for these organizations to pursue their missions, it can mean that local governments have difficulty raising the revenue needed to provide quality public services. This issue is most significant in areas with large non-profit hospitals and/or universities. PDF

 

Eye On Lobbying Government Accountability Board

Read it online!

News updates July 1, 2015

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Wisconsin Property Taxpayers, Inc.